NEWS

Werner Richter Wins Case
'This court ruling may well set a precedent. Now, every translator whose work is quoted in the media can refer to the ruling'.
In 1999, translator Werner Richter switched on Austrian radio to listen to a feature about T. Coraghessan Boyle, an American author whose work he translates. The programme lasted three quarters of an hour, and included a total of twelve minutes of quotations from two of his translations. No credit was given to Richter for his work either during or at the end of the programme. Subsequently, when the radio station denied any obligation to have mentioned the translator's name, Richter, with the backing of his association, decided to pursue the matter in the courts. The outcome is good news for translators in Austria. The Supreme Court ruled (29.01.2002) that objections made by the ORF (Austrian radio) lawyers during the lawsuit were without substance, and that Werner Richter should have been named as author and copyright holder of the translation in the programme in question. This court ruling may well set a precedent. Now, every translator whose work is quoted in the media can refer to the ruling. The ruling is, of course, limited to Austria, but is nevertheless a step towards increased recognition of the work of literary translators worldwide.






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